The Unexpected, Surprising Benefits of Posting Articles on LinkedIn

Yes, we’re all aware of the myriad of benefits of “building your brand” on Social Media from the multitude of Marketing/Social Media Gurus out there! …and I say that with the utmost respect, yes, I do, I really do! As the long time owner of a Career Management firm, we have routinely advised our mid-to-executive level clients on the necessity and benefits of maximizing their LinkedIn profiles as an integral part of their overall Job Search Strategy and provided hands-on assistance in that regard. Posting regularly becomes second nature to them ( we hope!) Writing articles takes this to a whole new level in terms of establishing them as Subject Matter Experts, gaining awareness and credibility, making connections, etc.;BUT I was quite unprepared to discover how much I personally ENJOYED posting articles! Here’s what I’ve found: It has helped me crystallize my thoughts , remember what I’ve learned and given me a venue in which to share it! Career Management is such a growing, ever-changing industry that as I run into different situations with clients, I now find myself automatically formulating an article in my head to share….confidentially, of course! Is it ego?…Partially, perhaps…certainly have one! All I know is that it’s a fun way to express myself and I appreciate LinkedIn giving us the opportunity to do so! ….and, thanks for reading!...

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6 Ways to Control Your Career

By Marlene Wallace Okay, don’t let me preach, but you know the first one! 1.) Take 100% responsibility for managing your career! It really isn’t your boss’ job, is it? And, besides, in a marketplace where people change jobs every two years and organizations every 3 years, that boss you’re impressing may not be there! 2.) Communication with the Boss: Meetings? How Often? Does your boss prefer face-to-face, email, phone? Adapt to his style! 3.) Aim for “early wins” that are important to the boss! Focus on his top 3 priorities and discuss at each meeting. What are his short term needs, medium and long term? 4.) Pursue good marks from those whose opinions your boss respects. Respectfully request a list of 5 key people outside your group that he thinks you need to know to “grow your contribution”. The Business Bibles’ call it “building strategic alliances”. 5.) Your Personal Development: Assuming you are excelling in your current role, ask about special projects, assignments, courses, certifications, and professional organizations you should pursue to …here we go again, “grow your contribution.” 6.) Document Your Successes: Make a 20 minute date with your professional self each week and write down your quantified accomplishments. What was the circumstance, what did you do to improve it, what was the quantified end result? What would happen if you didn’t accomplish it? Train yourself to look at your activities as accomplishments rather than “just my job”. Sure comes in handy when it’s time for a raise, performance review, promotion or that recruiter calls with an exciting opportunity! Again, if not you, who?...

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Top 4 Reasons Employees Stay ( It’s Not Pay!)

By Marlene Wallace Pay may get you there but studies have shown that IF the following ranked reasons for staying with a company aren’t there…chances are, you’re probably not going to stay year after year and be engaged, regardless of the pay! So, ask yourself, “Why do I stay”? What makes me go to work day after day and more importantly, want to go? Good Communication: Do you feel like you’re an integral part of the organization? Do you feel like you know what’s going on? Do you feel you have a voice and you’re being heard? Consistency in Message/Behavior from Boss: I speak to about 10 transitioning clients per day and I continually hear this lament: ” My boss is all over the place…. I never know in which direction we’ll be headed today or what’s expected of me.” We realize that some changes in directives may be coming from above your boss, but presenting a consistent message in terms of goals and the mission seems to be a vital part of employees’ well-being. Opportunity to do Great Work: Are you using your motivated skills? Do you feel good about what you and your company provide? Are you proud to tell strangers at cocktail parties where you work and what you do? Growth Opportunities /Progression: What’s the next step for you in this organization? Do you have a position internally that you aspire to reach? Do you hunger after your boss’ job and is it within reach in a reasonable time? If you see no place internally that you WANT to go after, may be a sign to a.) have a strategic chat with your boss and/or b.} start exploring options externally. Here’s a bit of introspective homework: Let’s assume you have two great offers! What are the top 4 reasons you would choose one offer over the other? Are there any that are NOT on this list? Weigh in…would love to hear from you!...

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10 Workplace Trends For 2015

Dan Schawbel Every year I give my top ten workplace trend predictions for the upcoming year. You can read my predictions from 2013 and 2014 if you missed them. My objective is to capture all the research and insights that I have tracked through hundreds of studies released by my company and third parties each year, pulling the most significant trends from everything. The highest level trends are the skills gap, workers dropping out of the corporate system, the use of automation and outsourcing and the pressure for companies to get more lean. All of these factors have created a system where everyone is always under pressure to stay relevant, choose degrees that turn into jobs and constantly reinvent themselves. While there are a lot of obstacles to the 2015 workplace, there are also a lot of major opportunities with millions of boomers retiring and more remote working. Below are my top ten predictions for the workplace for 2015. 1. Companies hiring Generation Z for internships. While many companies are still trying to understand and connect with Gen Y (or millennials), some companies are going to be heavily invested in the upcoming generation, Gen Z. Gen Z’s, born between 1994 and 2010, will become a major target for companies looking to recruit interns next year. The oldest Gen Z will be a senior in college in 2015. In addition, more companies are going to be recruiting high school students for their internship programs, including Deloitte, Microsoft, Rackspace and Lockheed Martin. In a study earlier this year, we found that half of employers are either currently accepting applications from high school students for internships or plan to this year. Companies like Facebook, LinkedIn and VMware are already paying high school students thousands of dollars to be interns and next year more companies will jump on board. This is happening for two major reasons: 1) companies are trying to close the skills gap (STEM) 2) companies are desperately trying to compete for the very best talent so they have to build brand awareness early and that means high school. 2. More millennials are taking leadership roles. A few years ago, PayScale.com and my company found that nearly 13% of all millennials in America were managers already. That number is expected to grow in 2015 as millennials become the largest percentage of the workforce for the very first time. In a new study between my company and Elance oDesk, we found that 27% of millennials are already managers, 5% are senior management and 2% are executives. In 10 years, 47% want to be managers or senior managers, 7% want to be executives and 15% want to be business owners. Ernst & Young has also helped identify...

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12 Mistakes You Must Avoid to Win an Internal Promotion

1. Over-using the terms “my career” or “promotion” in your discussions with your manager. Language such as “I’m committed to being a part of the company’s continued growth and success” is often more palatable then “I’d like to get promoted.” 2.  Going for too big a jump in responsibilities too soon. For example, a junior programmer for a software development company learned that a senior engineer was leaving for a new opportunity.  The junior programmer marched into the director’s office with a bulleted list of why she should be promoted to the senior engineer’s position, but her plan backfired. In the director’s eyes, it was too far a stretch. The junior programmer ended up with no promotion, when she might have landed some additional responsibility with an engineering title had she used a strategy that allowed for a smaller step. 3.  Bugging your manager with too-frequent reminders of wanting to be promoted. If, during a your “career conversation” with your manager, you’re being completely clear about your  expectations and your manager has openly discussed what you need to do to move forward, frequent reminders to the manager shouldn’t be necessary. Just be sure that you have calendared a time in the weeks or months ahead to revisit the topic with your manager.  In the meantime, you should continue to work with excellence and optimism. One Starbucks manager described the timing factor to me this way: “It ‘s music to my ears when an employee wants to be promoted and says it in a manner that doesn’t put pressure on the relationship.  I had one employee tell me, ‘If you want to promote me, I’m more than ready, willing and available to grow with the company; I also know you need great people out front with customers, so, until that time, I’m here for you with a 110% effort.’  I promoted this particular employee in less than two months!” 4.  Begging for a promotion because of financial pressures. Managers and business owners tend to take the attitude that you knew what the job paid when you took it and it’s up to you to live within your income. 5.  Pouting or grousing when not getting promoted as quickly as you would like. Act like an adult! 6.  Whining or demanding that you be promoted because you’re envious or frustrated that someone else on the team got promoted. You may believe that the wrong person got a promotion, and you may even be right.  If he is, the results of the decision will be revealed in due time.  Keep your frustrations to yourself, and continue to do a great job.  If the person who was promoted hangs herself through poor performance, you will be...

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